Jul 29, 2015

Interview & Giveaway: Each & Every One by Rachael English


Each & Every One

Each & Every One is one of the best books I've read and reviewed last year. I can't recommend this book enough, I loved it. Rachael English is the presenter of a popular Irish Radio show and she's now also a well known author. Each & Every One is her second novel. Her first one, Going Back, is on my favorites list as well. I think her books are very special and she has such a great way with words. I've interviewed Rachael English and asked her some questions about Each & Every One. 

The Questions

1) How did you get the idea to write a story about children who are used to luxuries and now have to give it all up?

To a large extent, the book was inspired by my day job as a journalist and radio presenter. For several years, my working life was all about the recession. But when you're working in daily journalism, you tend to focus on the big picture: losses, loans, politicians, bankers. So I wanted to write a story about how individual lives are affected by all of this turmoil. Obviously, it was people like Carmel, one of the book's main characters, who lost the most. At the start of the book, she’s trapped in a decrepit apartment block, surrounded by people who have no work. I was also fascinated, though, by families who’d grown up surrounded by plenty - and who suddenly had to fend for themselves. I found myself wondering what it’s like to be at the heart of an affluent family when the funds dry up. Do you really get along - or has money been papering over the cracks? 

I'm conscious that this all sounds quite dark, but I hope the book also contains quite a bit of humour.

2) What would you do when all of a sudden all money would be taken away from you?

What an interesting question. I guess we all like to think that money doesn’t matter, but if I woke up one morning with no income, no house and no way of finding another job, I don’t know how I’d cope. 

The Shine children cope very badly. Until their parents’ funds run dry, they have no idea how fortunate they have been. They've taken everything for granted. And then, overnight, their lives are upended. As Vee says, ‘Life without money is so damn complicated.’

3) What are the three most important things in life for you?

I reckon my list is similar to most people: family, health, peace of mind. If your family are OK, and your physical and mental health are OK, you have some chance of tackling whatever life throws at you. 

4) Life isn't always fair is a great theme to read about, why did you choose this theme?

It was something that struck me forcibly during the depths of the recession. Many people who had never lived extravagant lives were really suffering. At the same time, some people who had enjoyed very fancy lifestyles were able to walk away from their responsibilities. To begin with, the Shine children try to carry on as though nothing has changed, and it takes some of them quite a while to face up their dishonesty.

5) Tara is different, she's the sibling most readers will probably love the most (myself included), what do you think of her?

I’m very fond of her, but she's far too innocent for a twenty-nine year old! At the start of the book, everybody is taking advantage of her good nature, so she too has lessons to learn. I also enjoyed writing about her life as a reporter. In a lot of fiction, journalists are either exceedingly glamorous or the personification of seediness. Just for a change, I wanted to write about the day to day life of an average hack like Tara. Also, her job gives her an opportunity to meet people like Carmel and Ben, and it's through her friendship with them that she comes to see the truth about her own life.

6) What was the most fun part to write and/or to research?

I loved writing about the ‘other family’ - Carmel, Ben and Jenelle. Carmel is such a resilient person who faces up to the worst that life brings her with grace and good humour. Ben is great fun because he's so bright. Also, being only eight years old, he has a licence to say whatever comes into his head.

Then, at the other end of the spectrum . . . there’s Vee, the most spoilt woman in Ireland. Writing her character was a wonderful challenge because even though almost every reader hates her at the start, she does go on quite a journey.

As far as research is concerned, the part that had the biggest impact on me was the time I spent in the Dublin District Court, just watching the comings and goings. I found it so fascinating that I’m now determined to write a book set in the courts.

7) Each & Every One is in my top 3 of best novels I've read last year. What are your three recent favourites?

Thanks you so much, Suzanne. If we're talking about books published this year, I loved Weightless by Sarah Bannan. It’s about teenage bullying, so I suppose some would call it YA, but I think it goes beyond that. I also enjoyed The Long Hot Summer by Kathleen MacMahon. My favourite book of the past few years is Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

8) Being truthful and having secrets are important aspects of the story, what's your favourite kind of secret to write about?

Complicated ones! I’ve given this quite a bit of thought recently because I’m writing a book about an adopted woman who goes in search of her birth parents. She also has to face up to a number of her own secrets, and she begins to wonder whether sometimes people are better off not knowing the truth.

Giveaway

One very lucky reader of my blog will receive a paperback copy of Each & Every One. Good luck!

I will contact the winner via e-mail. If I don't get a reply within 60 hours the prize will go to someone else. All of my giveaways are international, you can find the official rules here.

38 comments:

  1. Panic and would have to rely on other people

    ReplyDelete
  2. I'd probably think the world is ending for me.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Aww I would be heartbroken inside my mind. In the face of it, I would suck it up and look for ways to survive, what other option does one have in such situations. I choose the best option which is to be strong and deal with it the best I can.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Make do and mend, and become a creative cook

    ReplyDelete
  5. I would ask my family for help.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I don't have much to start with but I think I would get by and survive.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I don't have much money to begin with living paycheck to paycheck, so I would adapt to the changes.

    ReplyDelete
  8. after panicking, I'd adapt and cope!

    ReplyDelete
  9. I'm sure my friends would help me until I found a solution!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Change my life to fit my circumstances xx

    ReplyDelete
  11. I would probably run to my parents. They certainly help me find a solution! :)

    ReplyDelete
  12. I'm pretty resilient & not afraid to work. Everything would come right in the end.

    ReplyDelete
  13. be thankful for my family, as we all help each other x

    ReplyDelete
  14. Cry a lot probably and then ask my family to help me.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I would start again but I'm not very into material things so I think I would be okay.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I don't generally have a great deal of money anyway so I would probably just start over again and do any work I could to get paid more money

    ReplyDelete
  17. Sell our house & start again in Australia!

    ReplyDelete
  18. I'd probably regret squandering money on expensive non essentials initially + then just budget with what I had.

    ReplyDelete
  19. I'd start over again from scratch - again ;)

    ReplyDelete
  20. I would ask my family members and friends to help me a bit so I ll be able to start saving my own money again. Lubka

    ReplyDelete
  21. I actually had quite a change in income about 10 years ago and have learned to budget tightly and live within my means. It's not always fun but it keeps me grateful. :)

    ReplyDelete
  22. I live on a fixed income anyway, and as a last result I would ask my sons for food and shelter.

    ReplyDelete
  23. I have no idea. I`d probably ask my mom if she could loan me some :)

    ReplyDelete
  24. I'd have to live without it for a month until I received next month's paycheck.. Make the most of what's in the fridge and probably end up eating ketchup for dinner. :P

    ReplyDelete
  25. Start selling everything extra and work like crazy!

    ReplyDelete
  26. I would have to come out of retirement, and work again.

    ReplyDelete
  27. I would freak and work extra hard.

    ReplyDelete
  28. If I lost all my money I'd sell a house and start over...
    CINDY B on rafflecopter

    ReplyDelete
  29. I don't think I could cope, I already suffer with anxiety and depression so I think having no money would make things 10 times worse. I struggle when it comes to sorting out bills ect too. Brilliant give away though, thank you xx

    ReplyDelete
  30. I've no idea - try and grow some food and ask friends for help

    ReplyDelete

Be an e-tailPR blogger